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StraighterLine-McNeese Articulation Resources

StraighterLine-McNeese Articulation Resources

StraighterLine is an entity that provides online, college-level coursework and assists in providing credit-earning opportunities for students that may otherwise be unavailable from the institutions those students attend. To ensure that this opportunity is available to McNeese students, the Doré School of Graduate Studies and Extended Education and the Office of Enrollment Management are working to formalize an articulation between StraighterLine and McNeese. This page is being used to facilitate that articulation by serving as the repository of resources for departments involved in the articulation.

ACE CREDIT Equivalency Recommendations for StraighterLine Courses

University of Louisiana System Policy I-A.VIII.1 - Prior Learning Assessment for Academic Credit

Articulation Matrix (.docx version of following tables)

**Each StraighterLine course title below hyperlinks to additional details about the course and its content.

Straighterline course code, description, and credit (per ace) mcneese course code,  description, and credit
Business
Accounting I ACC 101. This course focuses on ways in which accounting principles are used in business operations. Students learn to identify and use Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), ledgers and journals, and steps of the accounting cycle. This course introduces bank reconciliation methods, balance sheets, assets, and liabilities. Students also learn about financial statements, including assets, liabilities, and equity. Business ethics are also discussed. 3 cr. Accounting Principles ACCT 208. Basic accounting and financial reporting concepts and the significance of accounting information in financial analysis and business decision-making. 3 cr.
Accounting II ACC 102. Accounting II expands on what the student learns in Accounting I by focusing on corporate accounting. This course discusses how corporations are structured and formed, with an emphasis on corporate characteristics. Stocks, bonds, notes, purchase investments and analysis of financial statements are included, as well as an in-depth look at managerial accounting. Statements of cash flow, budgets, and budget management are also examined. 3 cr.
Managerial Accounting ACC 150. Managerial Accounting on the identification, gathering, and interpretation of information for planning, controlling, and evaluating the performance of a business. This course studies the measurement of the costs of producing goods or services and how to analyze and control these costs. This course analyzes managerial accounting principles and systems through both process and job order costing. Additional managerial accounting topics include the following: cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting and standard cost systems, decentralized operations, and product pricing. 3 cr. Managerial Accounting ACCT 241. Use of accounting concepts, techniques, reports, analyses, and interpretations as an aid to management. 3 cr.
Financial Accounting ACC 151. Students in this course explore basic accounting concepts and procedures and the interpretation of financial statements. The principles of accrual and deferral accounting are presented, including proper use of debits, credits, and fiscal year-end procedures. Students also examine merchandising transactions, inventory costing and valuation, cash management, and accounts receivable. The reporting of long-term assets, liabilities, and bonds are also discussed. 3 cr.
Introduction to Business BUS 101. Concepts, principles, and operations of the private enterprise system are identified in this course. Students compare and contrast sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations, and they learn the advantages and disadvantages of each. This course also discusses the functions of modern business management, marketing, and ethics and social responsibility. Human resource management is described as well as how employers can motivate their employees. Bookkeeping, accounting, financial management, and financial statements are also examined. 3 cr.
Business Communication BUS 105. Business Communication is a practical course that examines principles of communication in the workplace. It introduces the student to common formats, such as the memo, letter, and report. It helps the student review his or her writing skills to gain greater mastery of grammar, mechanics, and style. The student is exposed to techniques for writing informational, persuasive, sales, employment, good news, and bad news communications. You gain information on internal and external communication situations, with practice in audience analysis. The student is introduced to the communication possibilities offered by personal computers, cell phones, videoconferencing, desktop publishing, and others. 3 cr. Business and Professional Speaking COMM 301. Development and delivery of effective business and professional presentations. 3 cr.
Business Ethics BUS 106. Business Ethics provides an introduction to business ethics. Part philosophy and part business, the course covers a wide array of ethical issues arising in contemporary business life. Major theoretical perspectives and concepts are presented, including ethical relativism, utilitarianism, and deontology. The lessons explore employee issues and responsibilities, leadership and decision making, morality, diversity, discrimination, and ethics in marketing and advertising. Corporate social responsibility is also examined, as are the topics of environmental responsibilities, global ethics, and regulation concerns in an era of increasing globalization. 3 cr.
Business Law BUS 110. This course is designed to familiarize students with various kinds of laws, key elements of the American Constitution, and the concepts of the various schools of jurisprudence. Ethics, values, morality, law, and the various ethical theories are compared and contrasted, and the need for promoting corporate social responsibility is discussed. The elements of tort law, the basic elements of a contract, the sources of laws governing contracts, and the conditions for an offer to be valid are examined. Topics include reality of consent, capacity of minors, consequences of illegal agreements, assignment of rights, transfer of title, and the rights of third parties. Delivery of goods, right to inspection, acceptance and revocation of contract, the remedies available to buyers and sellers, and the nature of property are also discussed. 3 cr. Legal Environment BADM 201. Structure and function of the legal environment of business, business ethics, constitution and business, international legal environment, structure of the court system, administrative agencies, federal securities regulation, antitrust, white-collar crimes, consumer law, employment discrimination, and business contracts. 3 cr.
Organizational Behavior BUS 120. Organizational Behavior is designed to provide students with an opportunity to explore the behavior of individuals, groups, and organizations within today's dynamic work environment. Specific topics include communications, motivations, leadership, power structure, and organizational culture. 3 cr.
Principles of Management BUS 201. This course is designed to help students understand the major functions of management (planning, organizing, leading, and controlling) and the significance of each function in relationship to the existence of the company. This course describes how companies use management to set and accomplish goals through individuals, groups, and other types of resources. It also analyzes communication and ethics in the organization. Other topics include decision making, change, employee development, organizational structures, management control, leadership, conflict resolution, information security, and globalization. 3 cr.
Economics I: Macroeconomics ECON 101. Macroeconomics looks at the big picture of the performance of the national economy and its links to the global economy. This course is designed to examine many basic tools economists use, such as the economic perspective, fundamental concepts, graphing skills, and an overview of the interrelated components of the United States economy. It explains the importance of supply and demand, economic measures, growth, employment and inflation, and how these relate to the business cycle and the health of the economy. It develops the knowledge of aggregate expenditures and aggregate supply and demand, which have a specific macroeconomic point of reference. In addition to issues affecting the United States, the course examines various international issues important in today's global economy. 3 cr. Principles of Macroeconomics ECON 204. Market forces and government policies that affect national output/income, unemployment, inflation, and interest rates. Introduction to banking, foreign currency markets, and trade balance. 3 cr.
Economics II: Microeconomics ECON 102. Microeconomics is the analysis of the manner in which markets resolve the problem posed by the reality of scarce resources. A model of efficiency is constructed and is analyzed through the topics of demand, supply, production, distribution, consumer choice, the behavior of the firm, and market structure. A consideration of market failures and the role of government in a market-driven society completes the analysis. Other topics include international trade and finance. 3 cr. Principles of Microeconomics ECON 203. Analysis of individual behavior and the market process. Supply and demand, resource allocation, prices, cost and profit, the production process, market structure, international trade, and government intervention. 3 cr.
Personal Finance FIN 101. This course will equip you to understand, plan, and manage your financial affairs. It will focus on the development of practical methods of organizing your financial information, interpreting your personal financial position and cash flow, developing achievable and worthwhile goals, and implementing actionable plans and risk management techniques to meet those goals. Specific topics to be covered include money management, insurance, and investing. 3 cr. Financial Literacy FIN 201. Practical financial management of personal money matters, budgeting, insurance, taxes, borrowing, saving, investing in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and retirement planning. 3 cr.


Straighterline course code, description, and credit (per ace) mcneese course code,  description, and credit
Humanities and Social/Behavioral Sciences
Cultural Anthropology ANTH 101. This course provides a solid introduction for students who are new to the branch of cultural anthropology. Students are presented with all the basic information pertinent to the field. The topics discussed include: relevant anthropological theories, ethnocentrism and culture, language and communication, economic and political systems, kinship and descent, marriage and family, gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, religion and belief systems, colonialism and industrialization effects, and globalization. 3 cr. Cultural Anthropology ANTH 201. Diversity of human cultures; nature of cultures, social organizations, subsistence patterns, economics, law, religion, language and other facets of culture in cross-cultural perspective. 3 cr.
Western Civilization I CIV 101. This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the development of early civilizations from Neolithic times to 1715. Early and contemporary Western cultures are compared and contrasted, as are major religious, social, and political reforms. Other topics include the religious influence of Judaism and the Bible, the rise and fall of ancient Greece, and the transformation of Rome from a republic to an empire. The Crusades, the origins of feudalism, and the evolution of Christianity are examined, as is the evolution of the European economy during Westward expansion. The Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment period are also discussed. 3 cr.
Western Civilization II CIV 102. This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of concepts, people, and events that shaped Western culture from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Topics include: the rise of Eastern and Western Europe; the Enlightenment-era philosophies; the impact of the French Revolution on political, social, and economic world order; and the effects of the industrial revolution on Western society. Unification era politics; various methods of imperial indoctrination; and major political, economic, and social reforms are explored, along with the root causes and strategies that affected the outcomes of WWI and WWII. Social, economic, and political changes that occurred in the twentieth century are also examined. 3 cr.
Introduction to Criminal Justice CJ 101. This course examines the past, present, and future of the American criminal justice system. Topics discussed include how laws are created: the history and types of law enforcement; structure of the court system; and the changing philosophies of the American correctional system. Students also examine the role of legal precedent, the death penalty, prison life, and the juvenile justice system. 3 cr. Introduction to Criminal Justice CJUS 111. Review of the philosophy and history of the U.S. criminal justice system; a survey of agencies and processes involved in the administration of criminal justice: the legislature, the police, the prosecutor, the courts and corrections; and the role of law enforcement agencies in today's society. 3 cr.
Introduction to Communications COM 101. This course introduces students to the theories and principles of speech communication from a wide range of perspectives. The evolution of communication theory is examined and foundational principles, such as the communication process, perception, verbal and nonverbal communication, and listening are introduced. These principles are then applied to communication in interpersonal, small group, public, and organizational contexts. The dynamics of relationships, intercultural and gender communication issues, and conflict and negotiation are also explored, along with ethical issues inherent in the communication process. Discussions of current viewpoints related to interviewing, mass media, and new technologies present a contemporary view of the communication process. 3 cr. Fundamentals of Public Speaking COMM 201. An introductory course in public speaking with emphasis upon audience analysis, message development, and presentation of speeches. Experience in both informative and persuasive speaking. 3 cr.
English Composition I ENG 101. This course helps students develop quality writing skills by explaining and identifying the steps involved in the writing process. Five types of writing are examined-compare/contrast, argumentative, persuasive, narrative, and descriptive. The importance of proper grammar, punctuation, and spelling is highlighted. Students also learn research techniques, as well as how to edit and revise their work. 3 cr. English Composition I ENGL 101. Introduction to academic writing, research, and writing across the curriculum. Students will produce at least 3500 words of academic prose during the semester. 3 cr.
English Composition II ENG 102. As a continuation of English Composition I, this course focuses on analysis and argument while devoting attention to academic researched writing, critical thinking across the curriculum, citation, and documentation.  Students will use a variety of readings to develop several modes of writing including evaluation, literary analysis, classification, media analysis, illustration, and researched-based writing. 3 cr. English Composition II ENGL 102. Writing researched themes and exercises. Reinforcement of academic writing, research, and writing across the curriculum introduced in ENGL 101. Students will produce at least 5000 words of researched writing during the semester. 3 cr.
First Aid/CPR MED 101. This course is designed to teach non-medical personnel how to recognize and treat life-threatening emergencies, assess the victim, and treat cardiovascular emergencies and external and internal injuries. This course also covers emergencies in remote locations and childbirth emergencies. 2 cr. First Aid for the Professional Responder HHP 111. Preparation for certification in American Red Cross First Aid for the Professional Responder. Lecture and skill practice in prevention and care in emergency situations. Certification if standards met. 2 cr.
Personal Fitness and Wellness PE 101. This course explores numerous topics related to overall lifestyle, health, fitness and aging. Specific topics focus on understanding personal choice and the responsibility for health and wellness through lifestyle choices. Topics include personal risk assessment, understanding health care costs, weight control, flexibility and stress management. The course culminates with the development of a personal health and fitness plan. Throughout the course selected practical experiences, such as fitness assessments, are provided to guide the learning process. 2 cr. Fitness HHP 152. Description not available. 2 cr.
Introduction to Philosophy PHIL 101. This course is a critical introduction to the field of philosophical inquiry. After defining philosophy and identifying the major fields of philosophical study, the course examines the history of Western thought, from the famous Greek philosophers up to the cutting-edge intellectuals of today. The course then dives into various thematic topics, including metaphysics, epistemology, free will and determinism, evil and the existence of God, personal identity, ethical values, and political philosophy. The course concludes with an analysis of different perspectives, including Eastern philosophies, and postcolonial thought. 3 cr. Introduction to Philosophy PHIL 201. Philosophical problems including such topics as the existence of God, the nature of the human mind, free will and determinism, and the foundations of knowledge and ethics. 3 cr.
American Government POLS 101. "We the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union…" These are the first words of the United States Constitution, the country's most important government document. What did the framers of this document envision as a "more perfect union?" In this course, you will explore the result of their vision-the American government. In this course students will explore how the government is structured and how it operates, and you will examine the three branches of government-legislative, executive, and judicial-that make up the system of checks and balances. You will find that although the Constitution in principle grants certain rights and liberties to the people, many groups have not been allowed those rights in practice and have had to fight for them. But as you will discover, the very nature of the United States government means that the people have a voice, and that the Constitution is a living document, because it can be adapted and amended to change with the times. 3 cr. American Government POLS 201. Principles, structures, processes, and functions of U.S. government. 3 cr.
Introduction to Psychology PSY 101. Introduction to Psychology provides a general survey of psychology including the relationship between biology and behavior, such as how stress impacts personal health. Other topics introduced in the course include intelligence and reasoning, personality, gender and sex, memory, ethics, and research methods. 3 cr. Introduction to Psychology PSYC 101. Provides an understanding of human behavior and lays a foundation for additional work in psychology. 3 cr.
Introduction to Religion REL 101. This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of cultural religious phenomena in a global world. Commonalities and differences among religious traditions and contexts are analyzed, and various religious traditions and points of view are compared and contrasted. Philosophical formulations, sacred writings, religious experiences, ethics, rituals, and art are also discussed. 3 cr. Study of Religion RELS 201. Introduction to and exploration of the nature of religion and the religious experience, as well as those secular world views that have an identified ultimate goal. 3 cr.
Introduction to Sociology SOC 101. This course provides a broad overview of sociology and how it applies to everyday life. Major theoretical perspectives and concepts are presented, including sociological imagination, culture, deviance, inequality, social change, and social structure. Students also explore the influence of social class and social institutions, such as churches, education, healthcare, government, economy, and environment. The family as a social structure is also examined. 3 cr. Introductory Sociology SOCL 201. An overview of important theories and findings in sociology. 3 cr.
United States History I USHIST 101. This course focuses on the characteristics of societies existing in the Americas prior to 1861. Students learn about European exploration and colonization of the New World and they examine the impact on Europe, Africa, and the young United States. The emergence of political, religious, economic, and social institutions is discussed. Specific causes of the American Revolution are examined, as is the resulting impact on politics, the economy, and society. Students learn how the Industrial Revolution and Western movement changed the lives of Americans, they examine the causes and events of the Civil War, and they evaluate how Reconstruction plans succeeded or failed. 3 cr. American History to 1877 HIST 201. Survey of American history to 1877. 3 cr.
United States History II USHIST 102. This course provides an overview of the history of the United States and its effects on American society from Reconstruction following the Civil War to the post-9/11 era. Students apply historical research skills to major themes in American history and evaluate the successes and failures of various Reconstruction plans. Factors that led to the rise of Populism, American expansionist policy, and the development of the Progressive movement are identified, and the effects on American society are discussed. Students investigate the causes of World War I and analyze the social and economic developments that characterized the period between World War I and the Great Depression. Factors that lead to the Great Depression, World War II, and the Cold War are examined, and the major economic, social, and diplomatic developments of the Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson administrations are investigated. The causes, events, and consequences of the Civil Rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s are examined, as well as U.S. involvement in Vietnam and the impact of the war on American society. The major domestic and international developments of the Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and the first Bush administrations are analyzed and assessed, as is the significance of major domestic and international developments since 1990. 3 cr. American History Since 1877 HIST 202. Survey of American history from 1877 to the present. 3 cr.


Straighterline course code, description, and credit (per ace) mcneese course code,  description, and credit
Computer, Life, Mathematical, and Physical Sciences
Introduction to Biology BIO 101. Introductory Biology is an introductory course in the biological sciences. Topics included are cell structure and function, bioenergetics, DNA structure and function, cell reproduction, taxonomy, evolution, ecology, and an overview of the anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems. 3 cr. Living World I BIOL 105. Basic biological principles and concepts for non-science majors. 3 cr.
Introduction to Programming with C++ CS101. The course objective is to introduce programming in C++ and review the core computer programming concepts of variables, branching, loops, vectors, and functions; introduce object-oriented programming with classes and inheritance and covers use pointers and streams; and teach a variety of good coding practices, including iterative development, code formatting, and variable naming schemes.
Anatomy and Physiology I BIO 201. Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab provides a comprehensive look at the human body's structure and functions. Topics include organization of the body, characteristics of life, anatomical terminology, how the body maintains homeostasis, the relationship of chemistry to anatomy and physiology, and cell function and division. The skin, skeletal system, muscles, and nervous system are examined. Sensory organs and the endocrine system are also presented. Several diseases and disorders are discussed, and as well as the cause, detection, and treatment of them. 3 cr. Human Anatomy and Physiology I BIOL 225. Biochemistry, cells, tissues, plus structure and function of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems and special senses. 4 cr.
Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab BIO 201L. Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab provides a comprehensive look at the human body's structure and functions. Topics include organization of the body, characteristics of life, anatomical terminology, how the body maintains homeostasis, the relationship of chemistry to anatomy and physiology, and cell function and division. The skin, skeletal system, muscles, and nervous system are examined. Sensory organs and the endocrine system are also presented. Several diseases and disorders are discussed, and as well as the cause, detection, and treatment of them. Students will also perform and complete content complementary at home labs with accompanying assessments as a lab component to this course. 4 cr. Human Anatomy and Physiology I BIOL 225. Biochemistry, cells, tissues, plus structure and function of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems and special senses. 4 cr.
Anatomy and Physiology II BIO 202. Building on Anatomy and Physiology I, this course examines major parts of the body and how they work independently as well as together. The reproductive system is discussed as well as stages of human development. Students learn about the lymphatic system and the three lines of defense the body has against pathogens. Also explained are the cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, and urinary systems as well as nutrition, metabolism, body fluid balances, and aging. 3 cr. Human Anatomy and Physiology II BIOL 226. Structure and function of the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. 4 cr.
Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab BIO 202L. Building on Anatomy and Physiology I, this course examines major parts of the body and how they work independently as well as together. The reproductive system is discussed as well as stages of human development. Students learn about the lymphatic system and the three lines of defense the body has against pathogens. Also explained are the cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, and urinary systems as well as nutrition, metabolism, body fluid balances, and aging. Students will also perform and complete content complementary at home labs with accompanying assessments as a lab component to this course. 4 cr. Human Anatomy and Physiology II BIOL 226. Structure and function of the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. 4 cr.
Microbiology BIO 250. This course is designed to teach microbiology as it applies to the health care field. We will study pathogenic microorganisms and their role in human disease, human immunology, symptoms and treatment of microbial infection, and preventative measures against microbial infection. 3 cr. Microbiology for Nursing and Allied Health BIOL 201. Microbial cell structure, function, metabolism; control of microbial growth, impact of microorganisms on human health, and role of immune system combating disease. 4 cr.
Microbiology with Lab BIO 250L. This course is designed to teach microbiology as it applies to the health care field. We will study pathogenic microorganisms and their role in human disease, human immunology, symptoms and treatment of microbial infection, and preventative measures against microbial infection. This course includes at home lab exercises which highlight key concepts in Microbiology. 4 cr. Microbiology for Nursing and Allied Health BIOL 201. Microbial cell structure, function, metabolism; control of microbial growth, impact of microorganisms on human health, and role of immune system combating disease. 4 cr.
General Chemistry I CHEM 101. This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic principles of chemistry. The course begins with an analysis of matter and its components, stoichiometry, and intermolecular force and phase changes. Properties of liquids, solids, and gasses are also explored. This foundation is used to examine solubility, colligative properties of solutions, chemical reactions, quantum theory and atomic structure, and chemical periodicity. Other topics include main group and transition elements. 3 cr. General Chemistry I CHEM 101. Laws and principles of inorganic chemistry including, but not limited to, nomenclature. Atomic and molecular structure. Chemical equations and stoichiometry; gas laws; bonding. Quantitative problem solving. Introduction to periodicity, energy relationships, and solutions. 4 cr.
General Chemistry I with Lab CHEM 101L. This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic principles of chemistry. The course begins with an analysis of matter and its components, stoichiometry, and intermolecular force and phase changes. Properties of liquids, solids, and gasses are also explored. This foundation is used to examine solubility, colligative properties of solutions, chemical reactions, quantum theory and atomic structure, and chemical periodicity. Other topics include main group and transition elements.  This course includes a virtual lab component and supplemental assessments and exercises. 4 cr. General Chemistry I and Introductory Chemistry Laboratory I CHEM 101. Laws and principles of inorganic chemistry including, but not limited to, nomenclature. Atomic and molecular structure. Chemical equations and stoichiometry; gas laws; bonding. Quantitative problem solving. Introduction to periodicity, energy relationships, and solutions. 4 cr.
and
CHEM 103L. Introduction to general laboratory skills and methods including safety; basic laboratory techniques (to include data collection and interpretation; introduction to laboratory reporting/record keeping) as related to the topics in CHEM 101. 1 cr.
Introduction to Environmental Science ENV 101. This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the basic principles and unifying concepts of environmental science. Various ecosystems are described, and conservation efforts are evaluated. Other topics include the importance of maintaining biodiversity, human population growth and demography, and the problems of urbanization in developed and developing countries. Techniques of sustainable agriculture are evaluated, as are techniques for water conservation. The impact of air pollution on the climate and on human beings is analyzed and the factors that determine energy consumption and the use of fossil fuels are assessed. Local, national, and international policies, laws, and programs that aim to protect the environment are also discussed. 3 cr. General Environmental Science ENSC 101. Principles and concepts of environmental science with emphasis on basic ecology, natural communities, human populations, and resource conservation, agriculture, risk, and toxicology. 3 cr.
College Algebra MAT 101. This course provides a working knowledge of college-level algebra and its applications. Emphasis is on solving linear and quadratic equations, word problems, and polynomial, rational and radical equations and applications. Students perform operations on real numbers and polynomials, and simplify algebraic, rational, and radical expressions. Arithmetic and geometric sequences are examined, and linear equations and inequalities are discussed. Students learn to graph linear, quadratic, absolute value, and piecewise-defined functions, and solve and graph exponential and logarithmic equations. Other topics include solving applications using linear systems, and evaluating and finding partial sums of a series. 3 cr. College Algebra MATH 113. Fundamental algebraic operations, linear and quadratic equations and inequalities with applications, radical and rational equations, functions (exponential and logarithmic), graphing, zeros of polynomials, systems of equations and inequalities. 3 cr.
Business Statistics MAT 150. This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic concepts of business statistics and provides a comprehensive overview of its scope and limitations. Students perform statistical analysis of samples, compute the measures of location and dispersion, and interpret them for descriptive statistics. Linear regression, multiple regression, and correlation analysis are performed, as is model building, model diagnosis, and time series regression using various models. Basic concepts of probability are described, and the discrete and continuous distributions of probability are applied. Other topics include constructing a hypothesis on one and two samples, performing one-way and two-way analysis of variance, and applying nonparametric methods of statistical analysis. Making decisions under risk and under uncertainty are also examined. 3 cr.
Introduction to Statistics

MAT 202. In this course, students will look at the properties behind the basic concepts of probability and statistics and focus on applications of statistical knowledge. Students will learn about how statistics and probability work together. The subject of statistics involves the study of methods for collecting, summarizing, and interpreting data.After finishing this course, students should be comfortable evaluating an author's use of data and be able to extract information from articles and display that information effectively. Students will also be able to understand the basics of how to draw statistical conclusions. This course will begin with descriptive statistics and the foundation of statistics, move onto probability and random distributions, the latter of which enables statisticians to work with several aspects of random events and their applications. Finally, students will examine a number of ways to investigate the relationships between various characteristics of data. 3 cr.

Elementary Probability and Statistical Inference MATH 231 or STAT 231. Calculation of simple probability in discrete and continuous variable cases. Descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency, binomial, Poisson, and normal distributions. Testing hypotheses using normal deviate and t-statistics. 3 cr.
Precalculus MAT 201. This course provides a working knowledge of precalculus and its applications. It begins with a review of algebraic operations. Emphasis is on solving and graphing equations that involve linear, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Students learn to graph trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions and learn to use the family of trigonometric identities. Other topics include conic sections, arithmetic and geometric sequences, and systems of equations. 3 cr. Precalculus College Algebra or Precalculus II MATH 170. Topics from advanced algebra to include real number properties, solutions of equations and inequalities, relations, functions, graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, complex numbers, systems of equations, and the theory of equations. 3 cr.
or
MATH 175. Trigonometry, circular functions, and analytic geometry. 3 cr.
General Calculus I MAT 250. This course is designed to acquaint students with calculus principles such as derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, applications and modeling, and sequences and series. During this course students will gain experience in the use of calculus methods and learn how calculus methods may be applied to practical applications. 3 cr. Calculus I MATH 190. Functions, limits, continuity, derivatives with applications, integration, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. 4 cr.
General Calculus II MAT 251. General Calculus II is designed to acquaint students to calculus principles such as derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, applications and modeling, and sequences and series. During this course students will gain experience in the use of calculus methods and learn how calculus methods may be applied to practical applications. 3 cr. Calculus II MATH 291. Applications of integrals, techniques of integration, improper integrals, infinite series, Taylor's formula, parametric equations, and polar coordinates. 4 cr.
Medical Terminology MEDTERM 101. This course introduces elements of medical terminology, such as the entomology of words used to describe the human body. Students learn to apply proper terminology and spelling for major pathological conditions. This course identifies and explains the terms used for the integumentary, respiratory, nervous, reproductive, endocrine, urinary, digestive, lymphatic, hematic, immune, and musculoskeletal systems. It compares and contrasts the different body systems. Students define and describe the function of each system of the body. 3 cr. Medical Terminology BIOL 100. Latin and Greek prefixes, suffixes, and their combined forms with special reference to medical terms. 3 cr.
Introduction to Nutrition NUTRI 101. This course explores:

  • The types of nutrients you need
  • How your body uses nutrients
  • How nutrition affects your health
  • How your nutrient needs change at different stages of your life

This course also explores how psychology, society, and your own values and beliefs affect what and how you eat. 3 cr.
Nutrition NFSC 131. Scientific approach to understanding principles of human nutrition, nutrient functions and requirements during all stages of life, and medical nutrition therapy. 3 cr.
Pharmacology I PHARM 101. This course introduces pharmacology as the study of drugs. The course begins with an explanation of therapeutic and adverse effects, in addition to the basic operation of the nervous system. Then, several body systems and the conditions that affect them are reviewed, with particular reference to the use of drugs to treat these conditions. Topics include muscle relaxants, anesthetics, pain medication, and nervous system and psychological disorders. As students work through this course, their appreciation of how drugs affect the body in intended and unintended ways will increase. 3 cr.
Pharmacology II PHARM 102. This course continues the study of pharmacology. Several major body systems are covered, including the cardiovascular, urinary, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and reproductive systems, with particular emphasis on the endocrine and immune systems. The components and functions of each of these systems are reviewed, along with diseases and conditions that affect them. The drugs that are used to treat such conditions are studied with respect to their mechanisms of action, therapeutic effects, and adverse effects. As students work through this course, their understanding of the ways in which drugs act on the body will improve. 3 cr.
General Physics I PHY 250. This course will start with a descriptive approach. You will first learn about kinematics-the branch of mechanics that describes motion. From mechanics you'll move to the study of energy, power, and momentum. These concepts will be defined rigorously. You'll learn how Newton's laws need to be modified in order to avoid limitations: a few new and simple ideas introduced by Einstein. This course requires knowledge of basic algebra, trigonometry, and elementary calculus. 3 cr. Introductory Applied Physics I or University Physics I PHYS 151. Study of the fundamental principles of physics and their applications. 4 cr.
or
PHYS 211. Calculus-based physics: vectors, kinematics, Newton's Laws, momentum, work and energy, rotations, oscillations, elasticity and equilibrium. Intended for engineering and physical science majors. 3 cr.
General Physics I with Lab PHY 250L. This course will start with a descriptive approach. You will first learn about kinematics-the branch of mechanics that describes motion. From mechanics you'll move to the study of energy, power, and momentum. These concepts will be defined rigorously. You'll learn how Newton's laws need to be modified in order to avoid limitations: a few new and simple ideas introduced by Einstein.  This course requires knowledge of basic algebra, trigonometry, and elementary calculus.  The course includes labs to help support and explore the topics and complete the objectives listed herein. 4 cr. Introductory Applied Physics I PHYS 151. Study of the fundamental principles of physics and their applications. 4 cr.
General Physics II PHY 251. Welcome to the NROC™ General Physics course. This course is designed to acquaint students with topics in classical electricity and magnetism. The course emphasizes problem solving including calculus, and there are numerous interactive examples throughout helping students to learn about magnetism, electricity, optics, and atomic physics. University Physics II PHYS 212. Calculus-based physics: gravitational fields; waves; electrostatics; circuits; magnetism; and light. Intended for engineering and physical science majors.
General Physics II with Lab Welcome to the NROC™ General Physics course. This course is designed to acquaint you with topics in mechanics and classical electricity and magnetism. The course covers two semesters. The first semester is devoted to Newtonian mechanics including: kinematics, laws of motion, work and energy, systems of particles, momentum, circular motion, oscillations, and gravitation. The second semester discusses the topics of electricity and magnetism. The course emphasizes problem solving including calculus, and there are numerous interactive examples throughout. You will also gain laboratory experience through interactive lab simulations and wet labs. Introductory Applied Physics II PHYS 152. Study of the fundamental principles of physics and their applications. 4 cr.